ATMI 2010: Recreating the Secondary General Music Classroom for the 21st Century Learner: Teaching Music Through Composition with Technology

Barbara FreedmanMusic Technology Basics, Presentations, Session Handouts, teaching0 Comments

I was honored to present at the ATMI  Conference (Association for Technology in Music Instruction http://atmionline.org/) which met concurrently with the CMS (College Music Society http://www.music.org) conference in Minneapolis, MN. My session was entitled Recreating the Secondary General Music Classroom for the 21st Century Learner: Teaching Music Through Composition with Technology. Below is the abstract and a link to download … Read More

Turn Any Computer Lab into a Music Lab

Barbara Freedmanlessons, Music Technology Basics2 Comments

Originally published in the Connecticut Music Educators publication CMEA News April, 2010 For the last hundred years or so, K–12 music education in the United States has focused on reaching students with performance-based applied learning in band, orchestra and chorus classes, and in classroom general music. Applied learning in non-performance “general music” classes has been accomplished in the use recorders, ocarinas, harmonicas, … Read More

TI:ME Essay: Notation Software

Barbara FreedmanMusic Technology Basics, Uncategorized6 Comments

This is another essays as part of TI:ME Level 1 Certification and answers specific questions posed for certification. This essay goes a little further as it address the concept of music literacy. Before purists vote to lynch me, let me say that I think teaching students to read traditional music notation is important. However, I don’t think it’s of primary importance and I hope it becomes clearer in this article.

TI:ME Essay: Electronic Instruments and MIDI

Barbara FreedmanMusic Technology Basics1 Comment

This and the following two articles are papers I wrote for TI:ME alternate certification. First, a little clarification. Back in the day (as my students like to say), music software was divided into three separate and distinct categories. Software to manipulate MIDI, audio and notation were separate purchases. Today, the lines are blurred.